Top 25 Best Warm Winter Coats for Women 2018: The Ultimate List

Warmest winter coats LandsEnd, HANDOUT Warmth rating: 4 Details: Long (46 1/2 inches to hem), hits mid-calf; 3 3/4 pounds; waterproof; windproof Bottom line: Lands' End, founded in Chicago, designed the commuter coat with the Windy City in mind.

The front features hidden hook closures to keep your jacket cinched close, even when the wind is blowing. Zipper and hood are subpar. As the cold weather approaches, that doesn't necessarily mean it's time to stay indoors and shut down for the winter. It battles arctic air with fill-power goose down-which is super warm, soft and packable.

Guide to Winter Coats & Jackets Nothing comes between us and the perfect day outdoors – except our outerwear. Because we design the warmest winter coats and jackets that are tested in the lab and field to perform no matter what, with new technologies for staying warm, dry and on the right track.
The classic women’s trench coat never seems to go out of style, and this modernized design from Tommy Hilfiger will carry you through many a chilly winter outing. The double-breasted, wool blend coat falls at mid-thigh, making it the perfect choice to sport with jeans and boots, or a long pencil skirt.
Wool coats are dressier than down, yet can still provide significant warmth. A % wool coat will be toastiest, but one with at least 60% wool can also keep you cozy. Look for nylon in the blends — they're strong and will help with the coats last for years.
Guide to Winter Coats & Jackets Nothing comes between us and the perfect day outdoors – except our outerwear. Because we design the warmest winter coats and jackets that are tested in the lab and field to perform no matter what, with new technologies for staying warm, dry and on the right track.
Wool coats are dressier than down, yet can still provide significant warmth. A % wool coat will be toastiest, but one with at least 60% wool can also keep you cozy. Look for nylon in the blends — they're strong and will help with the coats last for years.
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Wool coats are dressier than down, yet can still provide significant warmth. A % wool coat will be toastiest, but one with at least 60% wool can also keep you cozy. Look for nylon in the blends — they're strong and will help with the coats last for years.

Add a faux fur head warmer for a super sexy look on those cold nights out. You can plan on staying warm and keeping your style chic and classy with this great looking, genuinely simulated faux leather pea coat. The Ovonzo super soft jacket will keep you cozy even in the harshest winters and stylish during the windiest spring. It is fully lined with faux-shearling and has good sized patch pockets at the waist with neat straight hems, to let you amp up your fashion game. The adjustable collar, graced with faux-shearling, adds flexibility to your look as well.

Double breasted, with hidden snaps, this great looking coat gives you a smooth, not-too-bulky look. Shearling coats are hot this season. Check out lots more styles of shearling coats here.

This long hooded faux fur plus size coat is perfect for cold winter nights. This beauty is fashionably loose and gracefully oversized. The generous cut gives you both style and comfort. It features long sleeves with elegant rolled cuffs with deliver extreme warmth and offer enough room for a flawless fit over your suits or other clothes.

The gorgeous attached hood is both flattering and warm against the weather. The hidden hook and eye front closure is highlighted by a single detail button at the neck.

Amazingly, this beautiful coat can be machine washed and tumble dried, which makes maintenance a breeze. There are so many awesome and flattering coats for plus sized women. Browse for more of them here. A great winter grabber from BCBGeneration, this blurry plaid wrap coat is a awesome addition to your coat collection. The drape front collar looks elegant, but you can also snuggle it up around your neck on the coldest of days.

If casual coats are your thing, you can add more of them to your collection here. This classy wrap coat from Vince Camuto features great styling, with a faux fur front placket and collar, and a wide, easy-tie belt. Made from a warm and cozy wool-blend, it features a concealed zipper closure, which keeps the front simple and stylish.

The side-entry pockets are big enough to stash a pair of warm gloves for the worst weather. Anne Klein came up with the perfect, classic belted wrap coat that features a flattering draped collar with an accent button at left shoulder. While wrap coats can tend to be bulky or boxy, this pretty coat hugs your body nicely.

The stylish fit accommodates broader shouldered women. This coat works well from fall to winter, to cooler spring days, and the classic winter white is a go to favorite in my closet, but it also comes in darker colors as well. Looking for a different style of winter white coat?

Cole Haan is well known for creating high fashion at approachable prices and this gorgeous wrap coat is a great example of just that. Alpaca coats are warm and luxurious. You can find more of them here. This gorgeous longer-length coat from Badgely Mischka would easily be on my list of top choices for its elegant look alone. The long, wool-blend coat offers up oversized lapels that feature leather trim and really unique looking gold-tone closure.

The slanted hand pockets, add to the asymmetrical look of this coat and add to the designer appeal. Leather accents on the pockets and cuffs add to the high-quality look of this super warm winter coat.

Browse for more great coats from Badgley Mischka here. Its really amazing piece of writing, I have got much clear idea regarding from this article. Updated Jan 2, at Published Oct 13, at 9: Such a nice collections of winter coats, Thanks for sharing with us.

Baby it's cold outside, and that means it's time to find a warm winter coat. We like the length, which works well for city wear but also can double down for light adventuring like winter hiking and snowshoeing. What do you sacrifice by going with a jacket instead of a parka? The obvious answer is leg coverage—the Patagonia Tres and other options on this list end around the thigh, which can make a pretty big difference when wearing jeans or other non-insulated pants in cold weather if you want more length, Patagonia does offer a Down With It Parka version.

Warm, waterproof, and looks great. The sleek Patera is the whole package: The biggest hurdle in choosing the Patera Parka is price. However, you do get some serious return on your investment. The full waterproofing is a very nice feature, and few casual pieces use best-in-class Gore-Tex. You also get a tough yet smooth denier shell, which can handle everyday wear and tear much better than the thinner options above.

And we appreciate the non-puffy style of the Patera: See the Women's Arc'teryx Patera Parka. Better arm length than the Marmot Montreal.

More expensive than the Montreal with inferior down fill. Both share a similar design: And both weigh just a hair over 2 pounds. In terms of differences, the Montreal has a DWR coating while the Downtown does not, and we like the length of the sleeves on the Mountain Hardwear better, which are longer than the Marmot and can accommodate a wider variety of people. We have the Marmot ranked higher because it uses better down fill vs. Neither manufacturer provides the fill weight for these products, but given that the Montreal weighs 1 ounce more and uses better down, we can assume that the warmth of that piece is on par or slightly better than Downtown Coat the Downtown does have a little longer back length, however.

Perhaps the answer comes down to fit, but overall we give the nod to the Marmot. See the Women's Mountain Hardwear Downtown. A great value and a clean design overall. Not as warm or soft as a down jacket. The vast majority of jackets on this list use down fill, which is warmer and loftier than synthetic insulation.

But there is something to be said for the latter, which costs considerably less and continues to insulate when wet. What are the downsides of a jacket like the Columbia Snow Eclipse? The jacket does get reasonably high marks for being cozy in cold conditions, but you likely will want to layer up when the temperatures get truly frigid.

These issues aside, the jacket looks the part for both outdoor and urban use, comes in a variety of nice colorways, and given the price, remains popular year after year. See the Women's Columbia Snow Eclipse. Perhaps the single most important factor when choosing a winter jacket is its intended use. Performance jackets, on the other hand, are more technical in nature and often lighter in weight due to the use of premium down and shell materials.

These models are designed for mountaineering, climbing, and other cold-weather backcountry use. To help clarify the best uses for each jacket, we list the category in the product specs and in our comparison table. Nearly all the jackets on this list have down fill, which is the warmest, lightest, and most compressible type of insulation.

A few jackets—including the Patagonia Hyper Puff—are made with synthetic, which is heavier and not quite as lofty but does a superior job at insulating when wet. It's also cheaper than down, which is why you'll find it inside some of the budget-oriented designs above like the Caterpillar Heavy Insulated Jacket.

We love both types of insulation and each has its purposes, but down wins out in pure warmth and coziness for winter. For more background on this topic, see our article on down vs. Warmth is a function of many factors: But the two most important factors in determining the warmth of your jacket are fill power and fill weight. Fill Power Fill power is the most heavily marketed spec among winter jackets and parkas, and refers to down specifically nearly all the jackets on this list are down.

The higher the number fill, fill, fill, etc. Performance winter jackets usually are around fill or higher, and casual pieces run from fill to fill. Fill Weight Fill weight is often overlooked but just as relevant as fill power. Instead of measuring the quality of the down, fill weight is simply the total weight of the down inside the jacket. The calculation becomes more difficult as the fill power changes: Around half the jackets on this list provide fill weight, which is more helpful than not.

As discussed above, make sure to take both fill power and fill weight into account. In addition, the shell of the jacket matters, as do the layers underneath. By our best estimation, the majority of the jackets on this list are designed to go well below freezing for use in the heart of the winter months in cold climates like the Midwest and East Coast of the United States.

For more lightweight and midweight jacket options, see our articles on the best down jackets and synthetic jackets. A major contributor to warmth is the layers or lack thereof you wear underneath. Depending on the parka, when the temperature really drops think well below freezing you may want to add a lightweight down or synthetic jacket as a midlayer.

The importance of weight in your winter jacket buying decision depends largely on the intended use. For those looking in the performance category mountaineers, climbers, winter explorers, etc. The type and thickness of the shell fabric matters in overall weight as well. Performance jackets tend to use technical fabrics that are light and thin, while casual pieces use more durable and heavier shells that add weight. On the upside, the thicker shells are much better at avoiding tears and small abrasions and therefore should last longer.

Lightweight down jackets require quite a bit of care and attention. Down loses its ability to insulate when wet, and therefore all jackets on this list offer some protection against precipitation.

Most jackets are water resistant or water repellant, meaning they have a tightly woven face fabric and durable water repellant DWR coating that will bead up and shed light moisture. If you combine that with treated or hydrophobic down a treatment added to the down itself that reduces water absorption and helps it dry faster , you have yourself a pretty effective system even in wet and heavy snow. Exposure to wind can make an otherwise freezing winter day even worse.

In terms of the wind resistance of a parka, a number of factors come into play including the type and thickness of the shell, amount and distribution of the insulation, and fabric of the liner. In particular, the shell itself matters most: The truth is that all of these jackets do a respectable job at keeping wind and the other elements at bay. Midweight and lightweight jackets are much less substantial and you run the risk of catching a cold breeze through the jacket itself, but this list is composed of heavyweights that all should be considered highly wind resistant.

Perhaps more than any other type of jacket, the hood matters a lot with a winter coat. First, the hood almost always is going to have the same type of insulation as the rest of the jacket, so premium down in the body of the coat means excellent warmth for the weight in the hood.

Finally, many performance-oriented jackets have helmet-compatible hoods, which are necessary for mountaineering and climbing. For use on mild-weather days, some prefer the option to remove the hood from their winter coat altogether.

For the coldest winter months, these heavyweight jackets and parkas bring the warmth. Best Overall Winter Jacket 1. Performance Perhaps the single most important factor when choosing a winter jacket is its intended use. Insulation Types Nearly all the jackets on this list have down fill, which is the warmest, lightest, and most compressible type of insulation.

It's hard to beat the lofty warmth of down insulation Warmth Warmth is a function of many factors: Wearing the Marmot Montreal on a winter visit to Glacier National Park Fill Power Fill power is the most heavily marketed spec among winter jackets and parkas, and refers to down specifically nearly all the jackets on this list are down.

Wearing the Marmot Fordham on a subfreezing day By our best estimation, the majority of the jackets on this list are designed to go well below freezing for use in the heart of the winter months in cold climates like the Midwest and East Coast of the United States.

Layering A major contributor to warmth is the layers or lack thereof you wear underneath. A plush lining is comfortable with or without a long-sleeve layer underneath Weight The importance of weight in your winter jacket buying decision depends largely on the intended use.

Weight isn't a major consideration for casual wear Water Resistant vs. A great lightweight option for clear and cold days, this jacket has been treated with a DWR coating.

It's water-resistant but not fully waterproof; when all layers are worn together, we felt protected in sloppy wet weather better than any other jacket we tested. Patagonia Tres 3-in-1 Parka - Women's. We gauged our winter jackets based on five criteria: The table above displays the Overall Performance score of each jacket in our review, ranking from highest to lowest. All the jackets we tested delivered some degree of warmth.

When buying a winter jacket, one of the most important features is the level of warmth being offered. It's also important to look at the climate you experience on a regular basis and think about what you intend on using the jacket for. Choosing the right jacket is crucial for staying comfortable and warm and enjoying the great outdoors during the winter. A jacket's warmth is based on the loft or fill-power of the insulation, along with the fill-weight.

Lucky for you, we tested each one side-by-side in snow, rain, wind, and frigid temperatures - all in our effort to find out which ones were the warmest for various climates.

We went hiking in each model and braved windy storms. We also wore them in varying degrees of temperatures and stood in place for extended periods. You name it, we did it. The warmest jacket we tested was our Best Buy award winner, the Marmot Montreaux , which earned a perfect 10 out of Loaded with fill-power down from hood to knee, we stayed toasty on some seriously cold days.

The loft of the down performed extraordinarily, trapping heat and keeping the wind out. Our Editors' Choice award winner, the Canada Goose Kensington Parka , was close in warmth and was filled with fill white duck down. The durable shell on the Kensington Parka kept cold air out and warm air in, scoring a near perfect 9 out of 10 in the warmth metric. Also scoring a 9 out of 10, cue the Patagonia Down With It Parka, which is insulated with fill-power recycled down. Both are insulated with plush, thick down from the hood to above our knee and did an excellent job keeping cold air out and heat trapped inside.

Most of the jackets offered specific features, which helped improve our warmth on cold days - the main one being fleece-lined pockets! What a lovely, cozy feature on a supremely cold day. Thickly insulated hoods, like the Canada Goose Shelburne Parka and the Marmot Montreaux kept us toasty and secure in stormy weather. The extra protection and down insulation made a difference when it came to staying warm in frigid weather 10F and below.

If you are someone that is always cold, or you just like to stay toasty warm, we'd recommend considering a knee-length parka. A common misconception is that because a jacket or parka has a higher fill, it will be the warmest. The Arc'teryx Patera Parka has fill European goose down, but is not the warmest contender; in fact, it ranks towards the bottom in regards to keeping us toasty on a cold winter day, scoring a 6 out of While it is not as lofty as the Montreaux or the Kensington Parka , the Patera uses Coreloft synthetic fill in high moisture spots - inner arms, hem, and collar.

We could feel the cold air on our arms and shoulders in cold weather because of this. In a milder climate of F, however, we appreciated the Coreloft synthetic fill while out on a short hike, especially when we started to get hot and sweaty.

If you're seeking a jacket that handles breathability and ventilation, we like the Arc'teryx Darrah Coat. We generally found that synthetic and insulated models with low fill powers lacked considerable warmth and were among the lowest, in regards to warmth, in our testing.

The Arc'teryx Patera Parka is a synthetically insulated winter option, complete with g of Coreloft synthetic insulation. It's not the best parka for weather below 25F or super cold snow storms, but we were impressed with how well it performed while blocking wind and keeping our core warm. While they were both surprisingly warm, they were not as toasty as the jackets that are insulated with thick down and high fill powers, such as the Rab Deep Cover Parka or the Marmot Montreaux.

The Columbia Heavenly Long Hooded Jacket is insulated with an unknown amount of Omni-Heat synthetic fill, while Arc'teryx Darrah Coat has grams of synthetic insulation which is equivalent to fill goose down. Despite being insulated with the equivalent of fill goose down, the Arc'teryx Darrah Coat was warmer in windy and stormy conditions. We'd believe that warmth and water resistance almost go hand in hand.

Winter weather can range from snow, sleet, wind, freezing rain, or just plain old heavy rain. All the models we tested offered some level of protection from the elements, from DWR durable water repellent coated nylon or polyester shell to full-blown waterproof fabric. Before buying a winter jacket, it's important to consider the climate you live in and the purpose of the jacket. If you are living in a wet climate like Seattle, having a jacket that is waterproof and warm is important.

If cold temperatures and snow are your typical winter conditions, a DWR coating should suffice. To figure out each jacket's degree of Weather Resistance, we put them through an array of tests. We went on walks on snow days, stood in place for an extended period in windy conditions, braved blizzards in the middle of the night, and we even brought the two-layer waterproof models in the shower.

The durable exterior shells kept us toasty and warm in windy weather, as did the thick down of Patagonia Down With It Parka and the Marmot Montreaux. Whether you're holiday shopping in New York City on a blustery day, or running errands around town in light snow, why not look stylish and warm?

The models we tested ranged in length, fit and function. Some had a smooth, sleek outer shell like the Arc'teryx Patera Parka , while others had beautiful chevron baffling, like the Marmot Montreaux. Everyone has their own preference, but what stood out the most concerning style was the fit.

If your jacket doesn't fit you correctly, chances are you won't like wearing it, which sounds like a waste of money. With that said, make sure to know your size and how the jacket fits before buying one, or brace yourself for the impact of reordering and returning until you figure out the best fit. If you're someone that likes to layer up, a jacket that offers more room in the arms and torso will be perfect for fitting a heavy layer or sweater underneath.

While everyone has their own opinion when it comes to style and how a jacket fits, the jackets we found to be the most appealing over our two months of testing were the form-fitting ones, like the Canada Goose Kensington Parka and the Rab Deep Cover Parka ; both scored a perfect 10 out of Oozing with style from head to toe, this knee-length contender is a show stopper.

From the smooth, sleek, water-resistant outer shell to the adjustable cinched-waist, no detail has been left out. The quality construction of the Kensington Parka is apparent across the board. Canada Goose continues to impress and the Camp Hooded was no exception. Compared to The Legendary Whitetails Anchorage Parka , which has many stylish features, the Canada Goose Kensington offers a heavy-duty option that's going to last longer.

Military grade buttons and zippers add a durable touch without jeopardizing the classy look of the jacket. The coyote fur ruff is highly functional in cold weather, as well as super stylish. The Kensington is comparable to armor, but it's also attractive, form-fitting, and feminine. In cold weather and stormy conditions, if your jacket isn't keeping you warm, your level of comfort might also suffer.

For some, fashion is more important than practicality, but for this review, we focused on both. We tested a range of contenders with various kinds and levels of insulation, like the knee-length Marmot Montreaux , insulated with plush fill-power down, or the lightweight synthetic Arc'teryx Darrah.

The models we tested delivered varying levels of comfort. Specific comfort features that attributed to high scores were thick and insulating hoods like on the Marmot Montreaux and the Canada Goose Kensington Parka. Plush down that was warm and not restricting was also taken into consideration, such as the down found on the Rab Deep Cover Parka. The Marmot Montreaux was exceptionally comfortable, despite being insulated with plush down from our head to above the knee; it's also very cozy and warm, which allowed us to be content in the frigid outside elements.

The torso, cuffs, pockets, and collar are also lined with fleece; these subtle, but vital features, add a cozy and warm touch. Last but certainly not least, the Canada Goose Camp Hooded earned a perfect score in this metric, provided us with enough comfort to sail through the winter. You may not realize how important a warm hood is until you try on a contender that doesn't have any insulation at all, like the Patagonia Tres Down Parka ; however, there is enough room underneath the hood for a beanie.

Our head to be noticeably colder in stormy or freezing conditions, versus when we were wearing a model that had a toasty hood.

Another factor that was important in measuring comfort was mobility. Jackets that ran small, or were tight on the shoulders, like the Arc'teryx Darrah , weren't as comfortable to wear because they were restricting and hard to fit another layer underneath.

Following closely behind, the Marmot Montreaux is our Best Buy, and is the warmest jacket in the review, at a cool $, as well as Patagonia Tres 3-in-1 Parka - Women's, which wins a Top Pick for those residing in wet climates. Wool coats are dressier than down, yet can still provide significant warmth. A % wool coat will be toastiest, but one with at least 60% wool can also keep you cozy. Look for nylon in the blends — they're strong and will help with the coats last for years. Warmest winter coats LandsEnd, HANDOUT Warmth rating: 4 Details: Long (46 1/2 inches to hem), hits mid-calf; 3 3/4 pounds; waterproof; windproof Bottom line: Lands' End, founded in Chicago, designed the commuter coat with the Windy City in mind.

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